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Comments

  • SAugsburger

    SAugsburger

    March 10, 2015, 10:14 am

    Flash drives have definitely surpassed Blu-ray discs in cost/GB, but save for personal backup flash drives are still hopelessly expensive compared to that other spinning disc media, HDDs.

    I can see the day when save for media servers that most average consumers will be using flash media for virtually every device they regular interact with in our daily lives. SD and CF have pretty much replaced microdrives. Flash media has became the norm on portable media players. Save for the ipod classic and the Zune HD virtually all players are now flash based. USB flash drives increasingly due to their convenience are replacing CD/DVDs for consumer backups.

    I see a bright future for flash media, but I don't see disc media going away any time soon either.

    Reply

  • Jimeee

    Jimeee

    March 10, 2015, 1:50 pm

    This is a just another classic anti-Treyarch post. The poor bastards are damned if they do and damned if they don't.

    They had the good grace to release 3 map packs - that's 9 brand new fucking maps and an excellent fun zombie game with each and people still bitch??

    Let me remind you that as great as COD4 was they only released 1 good map pack and the exact same problem with matchmaking occurs. If you don't have Creek, Broadcast or Chinatown you get kicked. You just noticed it less because there were only 3 maps it could happen on so the chances were low.

    The bottom line is WAW is a solid game, It would be nice if there was a separate lobby for non DLC but there isn't.

    I guarantee you MW2 have the plans for 2 or 3 DLC's drawn up and ready to go.

    Reply

  • nixonrichard

    nixonrichard

    March 10, 2015, 8:15 pm

    The closed fist hits very hard. An open hand will shift and crumple when it strikes, diminishing the impact of the blow. A properly engineered fist will shift only very little, making it effectively harder than any other configuration of the hand.

    Now, an elbow is still harder, but you have to be very close to strike with an elbow.

    the benefit of an open hand is really in clawing the face and gouging eyes. However, gouging eyes is a lot like ripping genitals in most regions of the world . . . that's fucked up man. If your life is on the line, go ahead and rip at anything soft, but otherwise, a fistfight is just a fistfight.

    Reply

  • Taladar

    Taladar

    March 11, 2015, 1:09 am

    Your argument boils down to "Look, PHP is popular so it must be good". If you look around that argument doesn't work anywhere. Windows certainly isn't a well-designed OS, the most popular TV-shows in any country aren't those made by the people with the most talent, the most popular web browser (IE) is definitely not the best one out there as pretty much every expert can agree on,... Why do you think that argument works on programming languages of all things?

    > Syntax is a superficial problem anyway, unless that of a particular language is incredibly onerous. You learn it and move on.

    I agree with that. 90% of the programming world do not. Ask yourself, why do almost all the popular languages have C-style syntax? Certainly not because the syntax is so great (especially not in C++).

    OO isn't a bad language feature. OO as a paradigm has probably held programming back more than almost any other idea except maybe "everything has to use design patterns". In fact I would say the "everything has to be...." is at the core of the problem.

    OO works fine for a lot of models of natural objects but on the other hand the idea that every function has to be the method of exactly one object is pretty bad.

    As is the idea to add encapsulation at that layer (instead of something independent like e.g. a module system where you can encapsulate several tightly coupled object implementations in one module and they know about each others internals but nobody else does (e.g. Haskell or Ocaml have module systems like that)

    Inheritance as the only means to write code that works on everything conforming to a certain interface is an equally bad idea. Haskell type classes are a much better solution for that particular problem.

    Reply

  • df1

    df1

    March 11, 2015, 3:26 am

    You attributed the convention of health care being to tied to employment to the US government and you appear to wish it continue, based on your opposition to health care reform. Do you support or oppose health care reform?

    I'm critical of economists in general. It does not matter whether they are conservative or liberal, both are based on ideological slant, biased assumptions, cherry picked data and some form of computer modeling. And I can find a Nobel Prize winning economist that is tailor made to fit any ideology that I pull out of my ass.

    Of course Austrian economists use computer models. Do you think they use pencil, paper and an abacus?

    Reply

  • metonCLMC

    metonCLMC

    March 10, 2015, 9:21 am

    It actually took a few days. She said she noticed it right away, but wasn't 100% sure it was for her - only 99.5%.

    Besides people not actually reading them, I think the biggest mistake people make when posting is they are to general with their posts, mine was pretty concise - something like

    You're the raven haired, green eyed, fair skinned girl who rides the XX bus downtown. You get on at X stop. I've seen you for the past 5 months now, and we've spoken a few times - I'm usually way in the back and you're up front so we don't get close - but there's a lot of eye contact. You have an orange Timbuk2 bag, and when you listen to music you have a pair of blue earbuds you wear.

    Reply

  • Labtech27

    Labtech27

    March 10, 2015, 4:52 pm

    I am a trained machinist. I can operate a lathe, drill press, milling machine, and program a CNC. I can weld, cut and bend sheet metal, and do all sorts of other handy projects. I have a BS in Physics and a BS in Mathematics, and 90% of my job as a lab technician is spent using skills I learned in high school metal shop, welding, and tech classes. I work with some brilliant scientists who devise some of the most interesting high tech experiments in condensed matter physics, but regularly injure themselves with screwdrivers. If you want to learn fabrication techniques, machining, welding, etc, take those classes in high school. I got certified while I was in the military. Community colleges also have courses in metal working, tech schools are usually good, but expensive and time consuming. Its easy to learn, but takes a lifetime to master. Ask a machinist if you can help around his shop, I guarantee he or she would be happy to show you enough to get you started safely (provided you will work for free).

    Reply

  • zubzub2

    zubzub2

    March 10, 2015, 9:41 pm

    >As a libertarian I object to patenting of abstractions.

    I lean libertarian, and I also oppose software and business method patents. But frankly, I don't see how libertarianism need dictate that.

    A right-libertarian might take issue with all patents, on the grounds that they are government-granted monopolies. They might take issue with none, on the grounds that property rights are useful for producing market-based solutions. But why would there be a specifically libertarian objection to abstract patents?

    Reply

  • vertibird

    vertibird

    March 10, 2015, 5:31 pm

    The article failed to mention to real problem: CA is effectively un-governable. The proposition system (prop 13 in particular) has hamstrung the government. Since any meaningful legislation requires a super-majority to pass, most bills now bypass the legislature completely, and go straight to the proposition process. The state functions more like a direct democracy than as a republic. The problem with this is that people will always vote for more funding, but never for more taxes. What we need is a Constitutional Convention.

    Reply

  • Capolan

    Capolan

    March 11, 2015, 9:37 am

    my point isn't about the guy's technique. Its about how calm he is in a situation that is not generally calm. How calm he is after even being struck at head level. This isn't something that is easy to do. It requires training to hold yourself back, it requires repeated training to be able to keep all those chemicals that are being released into your system in check, and that is something that doesn't come from practice per se as its hard to fake the body into thinking "fight or flight".

    the technique to me is secondary - its the composure he maintains that is of interest.

    Reply

  • KKJS

    KKJS

    March 10, 2015, 8:04 am

    It wasn't the Steam version that I was using.

    I downloaded the game from some EA connected online service, which didn't work and I luckily got my money back, and later tried borrowing my friends hard copy and it didn't work either. I couldn't get it to run at all.

    Almost tempted to try downloading it from steam JUST to see if it works that way. But it really doesn't seem likely since that would be the same process as the other electronic download I attempted. Obviously something weird on my laptop doesn't like that game.

    Reply

  • gnoah0

    gnoah0

    March 10, 2015, 7:29 am

    If you don't believe me, ask Richard Miller(who did the first port of Unix) for his opinion.

    For languages, especially systems programming languages, implementation difficulty matters almost as much as the language itself. They had plenty of theoretically better languages when C invented, but C's ease of implementation and model of the hardware won out. "Broken" aspects of C(like array handling and pointers) suddenly make sense in this regard, they're very easy to implement given the alternatives.

    That's also why C wins in the embedded space today. Any novel new system needs a compiler, and C is extremely easy to port, is well understood and people know it.

    If you really want to get rid of C find out a way to deal with multicores and concurrency better than Cilk. That *would* put a nail in C's coffin.

    Reply

  • keyboardsmash

    keyboardsmash

    March 10, 2015, 9:57 am

    No I'm not, my brother's playing COD, and apparently if I change the channel he will be forced to stab me while I sleep. D= WAIT WE HAVE ANOTHER TV. Oh man now I have to move my laptop. Wait it's only got 5 minutes left. Shiit. Oh well I'm here now.

    ANYWAY.

    It probably wasn't your older sister unless you're actually German. And those Alpha course posters piss me off no end. Didn't know there was a Chrittian Party! Good thing no one will ever vote for them.

    I'm sorry you were put through all that fundie shite, even more sorry if its affected you as a person. Religion can make people do crazy things. It shouldn't, but it does.

    Reply

  • mijj

    mijj

    March 10, 2015, 9:39 am

    How many MBA types, Harvard or otherwise does it take to change a lightbulb?

    The proposal for a case study .. the need for lightbulb change management ... a feasibility study will be ... decision ... select 3 best options ... presented to the committee for lightbulb oversight ... decision will be made to select resources ... milestones ... allocated for an in depth analysis of the requirements ... refer to Human Resources for ... decision needed on contractors or in-house ... extension on deadline ... ... ...

    Reply

  • NiKCell

    NiKCell

    March 11, 2015, 7:12 am

    In one of the recent updates, telefragging became a lot easier. It seems the hitbox for a spy coming through a teleporter is larger and will hit the engineer even if he is beside the teleporter.

    Best bet, if your teleporter gets sapped and there's no one around, just let it die. You can always run back and build another one. Teleporters are easier to rebuild than trying to reclaim your forward base.

    As a little addendum: I've been told that there is a distance which you can still unsap the teleporter and not get killed by a spy coming through. When I'm spying, I've never seen this happen and the few times I tried I couldn't get it to work as an engineer. Hopefully there is a way.

    Reply

  • ElectricRebel

    ElectricRebel

    March 10, 2015, 7:25 pm

    "I can't imagine the banking in the 1800's was that bad, as it fueled the Industrial Revolution."

    Here is something that free market advocates never mention when they talk about the industrial revolution: the advent of science!

    Markets have been around forever. It wasn't until the scientific method was developed (which had nothing to do with the free market) that the industrial revolution happened.

    There was a major financial panic about every 15 years during the 1800s that started because of some bubble (usually railroads) and ended with tons of bank runs. Although the 1800s wasn't a pure free market that you want, it does demonstrate how a freer market is less, not more, stable than the Glass-Steagall era.

    "Banking institutions that run in high risk debt will ultimately fail, banks would gain a good reputation in a free market, and the majority of people would want to do business at that bank."

    We had an era like that: the free banking era (look it up). It resulted in massive numbers of bank failures and little trust in the economy because paper money (all of which was gold and silver backed) issued by other banks weren't usable outside of the bank's region.

    "The government is ultimately saying that people aren't smart enough to invest their money correctly"

    It has nothing to do with being "smart enough". It has everything to do with bad incentives. The guys that ran the investment banks were extremely smart. They just knew they could get away with it all and end up with a golden parachute.

    "So you recognize constant inflation as not bad monetary policy? Have you seen what hyper-inflation has caused in many 3rd world countries? pre WW1 germany?"

    This is all of the short term hyper-inflation, which is incredibly harmful. I distinguished between the two. The long term low positive inflation that I (and everyone from Keynes to Friedman) advocate is helpful.

    "The statement about not stimulating the economy is ridiculous. Every person has the right to save money if they wish to."

    Putting money in a mattress is harmful. If everyone does it, it is effective deflation, which hurts everyone. If you want to save, the best way to do it is to put it in a safe investment like an FDIC isnured savings account or US bonds. This allows you to put your money to work for others and you can earn interest on it.

    "Saying that a minority of people saving money doesn't giving businesses big enough profit seems inane."

    I didn't say anything like that. You misinterpreted what I said.

    Anyways, I was wondering if you could actually stop dodging my questions and answer two things:

    1) Why didn't we have financial panics during the Glass-Steagall era? You said something about the Fed printing money, but if that was so bad, why did it sustain itself for 50 years?

    2) How would a free market exist without the powerful subverting it in some way?

    Reply

  • Qeraeth

    Qeraeth

    March 10, 2015, 6:34 pm

    We all have our little quirks. I actually smiled in empathy at your own, I get very anal about paperwork, notebooks, textbooks, and all sorts of books. I get uncomfortable when people handle my tomes since no one can give my babies the love I can.

    ...I'm not crazy.

    I think what matters is that your lover/spouse accept the quirks that are harmless. We like to order our personal space in a certain way- loads of us have those messes where only we know where everything is. I feel the only time one should step in is when the irrationality gets in the way of real life or is directly harmful.

    Thanks for sharing your story. :)

    Reply

  • AmazingShip

    AmazingShip

    March 10, 2015, 5:35 pm

    I recommend you donate to the World Food Programme, or some medical institution, as opposed to those developed enough to reach Reddit and make witty banter. Not to note that these people are not deserving of empathy, but that there 25000 children at life's end every day but for the reason of hunger alone. You have that responsibility, that prerogative to make sure they get the help they need, although at times AID doesn't turn over as you'd want it to. Governments are quite corrupt. Maybe starting your own non-profit to get schools established in those poor countries is a better idea, because that way you can personally see to it that people are helped by the hands you are offering them and goods being proffered; moreover, such valiant, bold tendering of the souls isn't going to be frowned upon by the cynics and the morons anytime soon.

    Whatever you do, wherever this takes you, I like to think that I'm appreciative, and that in a way, we're with you. Thank you so much. Here's to your heart.

    Reply

  • Baukelien

    Baukelien

    March 10, 2015, 6:08 am

    >We don't need to import milk, meat and most groceries. Rather things like cereals and tropical fruits.

    Yeah I got that :p but I was wondering what effect you see on the price of those goods especially in relation to home grown products.

    >I don't know how Icelanders' disposition has been portrayed in other countries

    Well by the right and the centre mostly as a bunch of assholes that try to weasel themselves out paying, and the left more the 'feel sorry for the average Icelander etc.' sentiment.

    >I've not heard any sensible arguments against repaying

    Well me neither but I've heard a lot of ridiculous arguments if I read sites like Icelandwheatherreport and other English language Icelandic sites most of the people feel they shouldn't pay anything, but maybe I'm wrong to extrapolate that to the rest of Icelanders.

    >but we're annoyed that the guys who screwed the system (with support of the governing political party, I might add) are now sitting on mountains of cash, having played the rules so as to leave their bankrupt firms stripped of assets with the aid of loans which then weren't repaid (adding to the value loss of the kaput banks).

    So why don't you protest more? All the photos of protests I've been seeing show pathetic little protests with 2000 people max. While Iceland, because of it's size, should be perfect for a more direct democracy and demonstrations that are effective etc.

    Although an apathetic attitude is the most common here too and sadly in most of Europe.

    >So, I'm for paying the icesave debts, although I won't do it smiling.

    I can understand that but hey our national debt went from 30% of gdp to 65% in less then a year(and will be even higher next year) so we're paying heavily too if that's any comfort.

    Reply

  • innocentbystander

    innocentbystander

    March 10, 2015, 7:44 am

    Well, you just changed the subject quickly.

    I was responding to your claim that the headline submitter did not provide an accurate summary of the article. On the contrary, he provided a very concise restatement of the article's thesis. This is what I said.

    I didn't say anything even remotely *resembling* a claim that "the essay structure has no place in political speech or opinion pieces."

    So, ironically enough, even though you started this by trying to claim the submitter intentionally mis-summarized the article... you then indulged in that *yourself* rather than attempt to deal what I'd just said on its own merits. I mean, you can't honestly claim to have such poor reading comprehension that you thought I was saying an article shouldn't have a thesis. That could only have been a deliberate twisting of my words, because you wanted to figure out a new way of attacking me.

    Well, I'm not playing your games. Quit trying to pretend to be an idiot and I might talk to you. Otherwise, I have better things to do with my day than play word games with partisan hacks.

    Reply

  • publius_lxxii

    publius_lxxii

    March 10, 2015, 8:32 pm

    >If I'm born into a family that has a history of making money in the stock market, it's going to be a hell of a lot easier for me to play the stock market, even if I suck at it.

    And if you suck at it, you'll lose your family fortune. This is a good example of the *inherent justice* of the capitalist system.

    Today, GWB's net worth is estimated to be less than a paltry $30 million, in spite of all the family connections. While this might seem like a lot - in the ranks of the rich and famous, he's a pauper. People more talented than he are managing what could have been thousands of millions (aka billions).

    If GWB's net worth still does not seem fair enough to you, how would you suggest improving things without running into the problem of wealth in the hands of one of the world's *worst* resource allocators, Uncle Sam?

    Reply

  • OhTheHugeManatee

    OhTheHugeManatee

    March 10, 2015, 9:15 am

    it's not about "talent" - lots of people have talent. It's about the ability that comes from that talent. My father is as talented a pianist as I've met - taught himself to play Rachmaninov without a single lesson - but he's not a great pianist by any measure. Lady Gaga absolutely has talent - quite a pretty instrument - but likewise, she is not a good singer. Maybe that's not important in pop music, I don't know. In jazz for instance, there are some empirically bad singers who are/were great jazz musicians. Louis Armstrong comes to mind, or Billy Holliday.

    I don't listen to much pop music, but I can give you examples in Jazz, since that tends to be easier for most people than opera. Ella Fitzgerald, Sarah Vaughan, Dinah Washington, Peggy Lee, Nina Simone, Diana Krall, Frank Sinatra, Bing Crosby, Michael Buble, Sammy Davis Jr., Nat "King" Cole... by no means exhaustive but that's a starting point. Most of the famous jazz singers in the 50s and 60s were seriously vocally trained, and it showed.

    For a lot of people it's easier to hear in instruments. Compare the pianists in popular music - the most amazing selection you can find - with Jazz great Oscar Peterson. I don't even have to go to people who can play Liszt and other impossibilities. Again, this doesn't necessarily make or break an artist, depending on your art form. Thelonious Monk was a disaster at the keyboard, but holy shit what an amazing jazz musician.

    Reply

  • anonymous-coward

    anonymous-coward

    March 11, 2015, 7:01 am

    > You and the rest of the defenders of Iran will still try to say that Israel is the evil one.

    See, you're spazzing our again. I'm not a defender of Iran. I said that I think they're trying to get the bomb, but by staying within the letter of the NNPT, at least as long as possible.

    > And what does "shit hitting the fan mean"? ... So, really, how is your comment relevant?

    It means that the\_nuclear\_lobby's claim that "Nations can even withdraw from the treaty under Article 10 if they give 90 days notice - North Korea did so back in 2003." is not really correct. If Iran exercises this privilege, *in theory legally becoming a non-NNPT nuclear power just like Israel*, it will still be subjected to punitive sanctions, or at least an attempt at sanctions.

    Hence the\_nuclear\_lobby's claim that the principal distinction between Israel and Iran is that the latter signed the NNPT is probably incorrect, because Iran will not be treated like Israel if it exercises its right to un-sign the treaty. Whether you view this double standard as good or bad is irrelevant to this judgment of the validity of the\_nuclear\_lobby's statement.

    > If you are going to defend their building secret nuclear facilities, then go all the way.

    See. You're spazzing out again. You are incapable of thinking rationally. Pointing out that they may not be in technical violation of a treaty is not the same as "defending" them.

    Reply

  • mikepurvis

    mikepurvis

    March 11, 2015, 2:02 am

    > It's unfortunate that things got that far and he felt compelled to kill himself, but we can't pretend like he was the victim.

    I know. He's in the wrong. His actions are his responsibility. The camp made a mistake to trust him.

    But I still feel that his church and religious environment (including the camp and Inter-Varsity) bear a responsibility here. I don't know the specifics, of course, but I can easily imagine that he was under wildly unrealistic expectations with regards to his sexuality, and was offered little or no support.

    Reply

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